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Indians of Genesee County Michigan

HISTORY HOUSE SAMPLE PAGES
Myths and Legends of Central U.S. and Great Lakes
Early History Ionia Michigan
Captured by The Indians Mrs. Mary Rowlandson
Centennial History Muskegon Michigan
Life In The Copper Mines of Lake Superior
Campbell County Tennessee
Auglaize County Ohio
Ottawa County Kansas
Carroll County Tennessee
Among the Arapahoe Indians
Aborigines and Explorers of Butler County Pennsylvania
Indian Boyhood Life and Adventures
History of White Earth Indian Reservation in Minnesota
Captivitiy Among the Sioux 1862
Early Settlers of Clark County Illinois
Ellis County Kansas
Inkpaduta Indian Massacre
Ute Indian Massacre 1879
Carter County Tennessee
Sioux Indian Massacre New Ulm Minnesota
Indians of Genesee County Michigan
Indians of Long Island New York
Coffee County Tennessee
Lorain County Ohio
Traditions of Blackfeet Indians
Indian Massacre Cherry Valley New York
Goodhue County Minnesota History
Wellsboro Pennsylvania History
Woodbury County Iowa
Pioneer Life Genesee County Michigan
Columbus Ohio Flood 1913
Giles County Tennessee
Decatur County Tennessee
Jewell County Kansas
Farmington Maine
Jefferson County Nebraska
Pioneer Life Near Dearborn Michigan
Holyoke Massachusetts
Orleans County New York
Hamilton County Ohio
Greenwood County Kansas

Huge Collection of 85 American Indian Reports Click Here

Indians of Genesee County Michigan
 Extracted from “History of Genesee County”
 by Edwin O. Wood 1916.

Headings include:

 

  • THE STORY OF AY-OUN-A-WA-TA.
  • THE FIVE NATIONS
  • HOCHELAGA
  • SWAG-O-NO--THE-PEOPLE-WHO-WENT-OUT-OF-THE-LAND
  • THE MOUND BUILDERS
  • GENESEE COUNTY UNDER HURON-IROQUOIS OCCUPANCY
  • THE OTTAWAS
  • THE CHIPPEWAS
  • ROMANTIC TRADITIONS
  • THE BATTLE OF LONG LAKE
  • THE CAPTIVE OF THE SAGINAW

    56 pages

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    twelve women who were sent to the Sioux. This story was told by an old Indian, Put-ta-gua-se-mine.

    It might also be said of Mr. Ellis's account that the name Onottoways, which he gives to the people living in the vicinity of the Sauks, and who suffered a like fate; is no more nor less than one of the names of the Ottawas, variously spelled Ottaways, Ouwaes, Ouatonais, and a dozen other ways. the particular form used by Mr. Ellis seems to be made by prefixing the Huron "ono" (people) to "Ottoways," making "Ono-Ottaways," contracted to Onottoways" (the Ottawa folk). As there was a village of the Ottawas here after the departure of the Sauks somewhere near the place assigned as the location of the "Onottoways," a tradition of which probably lingered in the minds of the Chippewas, their boastful story of the expedition could well include this "other people," although the Sauks and Onottoways were never synchronous residents in the Saginaw country.

    The most serious objection to the tale, however, is the fact tht the Sauks never suffered any such crushing calamity as related. They fled to Wisconsin, where they were so numerous that in 1787 Joseph Aisne found a single village of them containing seven hundred men, and in 1763 so close was the bond of friendship between then that no other tribe except the "Osangees" was admitted to the secret councils of the Chippewas in which were perfected the plans for taking the fort at Michilimackinac; the two alone carried the plan into effect.

    The various stories told by the Chippewas as to this war against the Sauks seem to have been given in explanation of various places of burial along the Saginaw river and its tributaries, where the remains of considerable numbers of humans were found. From first-hand evidence obtained by the writer of this chapter from various Chippewas of Minnesota and from excavation of mounds in that state, it was found invariably that the Chippewas explain a place of common burial as a "big battle." Communal interment was the custom among the Hurons, but not among the Chippewas; consequently a battle seemed to them to be the natural explanation of such common burials.

    From all the facts it seems that the story referred to of the expedition of the Chippewas must be put in the category of myths,

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